Epistemic Injustice in Research Evaluation: A Cultural Analysis of the Humanities and Physics in Estonia

Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (2):108-132 (2012)
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Abstract

This paper explores the issue of epistemic injustice in research evaluation. Through an analysis of the disciplinary cultures of physics and humanities, we attempt to identify some aims and values specific to the disciplinary areas. We suggest that credibility is at stake when the cultural values and goals of a discipline contradict those presupposed by official evaluation standards. Disciplines that are better aligned with the epistemic assumptions of evaluation standards appear to produce more "scientific" findings. To restore epistemic justice in research evaluation, we argue that the specificity of a discipline's epistemic aims, values, and cultural identities must be taken into account

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Jaana Eigi-Watkin
University of Tartu

Citations of this work

Epistemic Injustice.Rachel McKinnon - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):437-446.
Applying the notion of epistemic risk to argumentation in philosophy of science.Jaana Eigi-Watkin - 2022 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 12 (2):1-18.
Towards a phronetic space for responsible research.Emanuele Bardone & Marianne Lind - 2016 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 12 (1):1-18.

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