Methods of ethics and the descent of man: Darwin and Sidgwick on ethics and evolution

Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):361-378 (2010)
Authors
Hallvard Lillehammer
Birkbeck College, University Of London
Abstract
Darwin’s treatment of morality in The Descent of Man has generated a wide variety of responses among moral philosophers. Among these is the dismissal of evolution as irrelevant to ethics by Darwin’s contemporary Henry Sidgwick; the last, and arguably the greatest, of the Nineteenth Century British Utilitarians. This paper offers a re-examination of Sidgwick’s response to evolutionary considerations as irrelevant to ethics and the absence of any engagement with Darwin’s work in Sidgwick’s main ethical treatise, The Methods of Ethics . This assessment of Sidgwick’s response to Darwin’s work is shown to have significance for a number of ongoing controversies in contemporary metaethics.
Keywords Philosophy   Evolutionary Biology   Philosophy of Biology
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DOI 10.1007/s10539-010-9204-8
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Reasons and Persons.Derek Parfit - 1984 - Oxford University Press.

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