Oxford University Press (2009)

Authors
Paisley Livingston
Lingnan University
Abstract
The increasingly popular idea that cinematic fictions can "do" philosophy raises some difficult questions. Who is actually doing the philosophizing? Is it the philosophical commentator who reads general arguments or theories into the stories conveyed by a film? Could it be the film-maker, or a group of collaborating film-makers, who raise and try to answer philosophical questions with a film? Is there something about the experience of films that is especially suited to the stimulation of worthwhile philosophical reflections? In the first part of this book, Paisley Livingston surveys positions and arguments surrounding the cinema's philosophical value. He raises criticisms of bold theses in this area and defends a moderate view of film's possible contributions to philosophy. In the second part of the book he defends an intentionalist approach that focuses on the film-makers' philosophical background assumptions, sources, and aims. Livingston outlines intentionalist interpretative principles as well as an account of authorship in cinema. The third part of the book exemplifies this intentionalist approach with reference to the work of Ingmar Bergman. Livingston explores the connection between Bergman's work and the Swedish director's primary philosophical source-a treatise in philosophical psychology authored by the Finnish philosopher, Eino Kaila. Bergman proclaimed that reading this book was a tremendous philosophical experience for him and that he "built on this ground." With reference to materials in the newly created Ingmar Bergman archive, Livingston shows how Bergman took up Kaila's topics in his cinematic explorations of motivated irrationality, inauthenticity, and the problem of self-knowledge
Keywords Motion pictures Philosophy  Philosophy in motion pictures
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Reprint years 2012
Call number PN1995.L5428 2009
ISBN(s) 9780199570171   0199570175     9780199655144
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Chapters BETA
Introduction

This chapter identifies some influential contentions about film's contributions to philosophy and raises a number of basic questions about the source and nature of this cinematic philosophizing. Is it ‘the film itself’ that ‘does philosophy’, as has sometimes been claimed? Or is it the com... see more

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Are There Definite Objections to Film as Philosophy? Metaphilosophical Considerations.Diana Neiva - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. Nova Iorque, NY, Estados Unidos: pp. 116-134.
Nature Screened: An Eco-Film-Phenomenology.Ilan Safit - 2014 - Environmental Philosophy 11 (2):211-235.
Philosophy of Film.Thomas Wartenberg - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Quaderns de filosofia V, 1.Quad Fia - 2018 - Quaderns de Filosofia 5 (1).

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