Oxford University Press (2006)

Authors
Anne Long
Macquarie University
Abstract
A. A. Long, one of the world's leading writers on ancient philosophy, presents eighteen essays on the philosophers and schools of the Hellenistic and Roman periods--Epicureans, Stoics, and Sceptics. The discussion ranges over four centuries of innovative and challenging thought in ethics and politics, psychology, epistemology, and cosmology.
Keywords Philosophy, Ancient  Skepticism  Stoics
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Call number B505.L65 2006
ISBN(s) 0199279128   9780199279128   019927911X   9780199279111
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Chapters BETA
Hellenistic Ethics and Philosophical Power

The peculiarity of Hellenistic ethics is explored to understand its special significance. The issue is approached as a question concerning the intellectual history of Hellenistic philosophy in its formative years. A comprehensive answer would have to include subsequent developments of the ... see more

Hellenistic Ethics as the Art of Life

This chapter focuses on the idea of philosophy as the art of life, studying the foundations and implications of this idea, with a view to asking whether some version of it can still be useful to ethics. The embryo of this idea can be traced back to Socrates and the sophists, but its full a... see more

Aristotle and the History of Greek Scepticism

The purpose in this chapter is not to cast doubt on Aristotle's dogmatic credentials, but rather focuses on a series of questions that seem to have gone largely unasked. How far is Aristotle aware of the sceptical challenge to knowledge, and how far does he attempt to answer it? How does h... see more

Arcesilaus in His Time and Place

No philosopher in the early Hellenistic period is more intriguing than Arcesilaus of Pitane, and few are of comparable historical significance. Arcesilaus in effect was the founder of Greek scepticism as a methodology for demonstrating that every claim to knowledge or theoretical belief co... see more

Lucretius on nature and the Epicurean self

This chapter treats some of the ways in which Lucretius integrates the subjective and objective aspects of the Epicurean self. The term ‘integrates’ is used because there has been a tendency to regard Lucretius' objective voice as a register seriously at odds with his violent metaphors and... see more

Cicero's Plato and Aristotle

The aim of this chapter is to approach Cicero's philosophical work by studying his assessments and use of Plato and Aristotle. It is argued that there is more to Cicero's Plato and Aristotle than can be ascertained from his purely philosophical background and sympathies. Cicero was not a p... see more

Cicero's Politics in De officiis

TheDe officiis(henceforthOff.) is one of the ‘great books’, but no one today perhaps can read it with fresh eyes. Less obvious aboutOff. is the work's radical nature in its effort to reform Roman ideology. ApproachingOff., as Cicero encourages us to do via his adaptation of Panaetius, inte... see more

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Citations of this work BETA

Ancient Skepticism: Pyrrhonism.Diego E. Machuca - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (4):246-258.
Ancient Skepticism: Overview.Diego E. Machuca - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (4):234-245.
Ancient Skepticism: The Skeptical Academy.Diego Machuca - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (4):259-266.

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