Abstract
: Following a long process of revision, a new version of the Declaration of Helsinki was approved by the World Medical Association in 2000. Two provisions of the Declaration address ongoing international controversies regarding research sponsored by industrialized countries and conducted in developing countries. Despite the issuance of the final version of the Declaration, opponents remain locked in debate. Moreover, the Declaration remained silent on other prominent controversies concerning international research. An analysis of these current controversies reveals reasons why they are not likely to be readily resolved, despite apparent agreement by opponents on overarching ethical principles
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DOI 10.1353/ken.2001.0005
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The Vulnerable and the Susceptible.Michael H. Kottow - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (5-6):460-471.
Accounting for Culture in Globalized Bioethics.Patricia Marshall & Barbara Koenig - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):252-266.

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