Forgiveness and Moral Solidarity

In Stephen Bloch-Shulman & David White (eds.), Forgiveness: Probing the Boundaries. Inter-Disciplinary Press (2008)
Abstract
The categorical denial of third-party forgiveness represents an overly individualistic approach to moral repair. Such an approach fails to acknowledge the important roles played by witnesses, bystanders, beneficiaries, and others who stand in solidarity to the primary victim and perpetrator. In this paper, I argue that the prerogative to forgive or withhold forgiveness is not universal, but neither is it restricted to victims alone. Not only can we make moral sense of some third-party acts and utterances of the form, “I can or cannot forgive…” but also, we ought to recognize them as legitimate instances of third party forgiveness. Concern for the primary victim’s autonomy tends to exaggerate a need for moral deference, while ignoring how others are called upon to support and mediate for victims of violence and oppression. I advocate a cautious extension of the victim’s prerogative to forgive, one that grounds forgiveness in a double relation of sympathetic identification and attentive care. Following Jean Harvey’s recent work, I call this relationship moral solidarity. Furthermore, I argue, there are important moral and political reasons to acknowledge third party forgiveness; these reasons are particularly evident in contexts of oppression. In fact, third party refusals to forgive may have particular moral significance. In situations of abuse, oppression and damaged self-respect, third party refusals may protect the agency of victims who too easily forgive.
Keywords Forgiveness  Third-Party Forgiveness  Oppression  Solidarity
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history
Request removal from index
Translate to english
Download options
Our Archive
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Self-Forgiveness and Forgiveness.Zenon Szablowinski - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 53 (4):678-689.
Moral Bystanders and the Virtue of Forgiveness.Linda Radzik - 2010 - In Christopher R. Allers & Marieke Smit (eds.), Forgiveness in Perspective. Rodopi. pp. 66--69.
The Nature and Limits of Forgiveness.Alice MacLachlan - 2008 - Dissertation, Boston University
The Standing to Forgive.Glen Pettigrove - 2009 - The Monist 92 (4):583-603.
The Importance of Self-Forgiveness.Byron Williston - 2012 - American Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):67 - 80.
Supererogatory Forgiveness.Espen Gamlund - 2010 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (6):540-564.
Forgiveness Without Blame.Espen Gamlund - 2011 - In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness. Routledge.
Personal and Redemptive Forgiveness.Christopher Bennett - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):127–144.
Hampton on Forgiveness.Linda Radzik - 2011 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Law 10 (2):1-6.
For Community's Sake: A (Self-Respecting) Kantian Account of Forgiveness.Kate A. Moran - forthcoming - Proceedings of the XI International Kant-Kongress.
The Philosophical Controversy Over Political Forgiveness.Alice MacLachlan - 2012 - In Paul van Tongeren, Neelke Doorn & Bas van Stokkom (eds.), Public Forgiveness in Post-Conflict Contexts. Intersentia. pp. 37-64.

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2010-09-21

Total downloads

199 ( #20,883 of 2,168,551 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

24 ( #14,222 of 2,168,551 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.

Other forums