Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):264-273 (2005)

Abstract
In the lead article in this symposium issue, Edward Imwinkelried follows other scholars in distinguishing among three types of tasks for ethicists serving as expert witnesses: descriptive ; metaethical ; and normative. He finds agreement that the admissibility of descriptive or metaethical evidence rests upon the usual criteria of helpfulness and reliability. He breaks new ground in arguing that normative evidence typically relates to the judge's legislative rather than adjudicative function and therefore need not satisfy the usual standards for admissibility in order to be considered.
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DOI 10.1111/j.1748-720X.2005.tb00492.x
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References found in this work BETA

Expert Testimony by Ethicists: What Should Be the Norm?Edward J. Imwinkelried - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):198-221.
Expert Testimony by Ethicists: What Should Be the Norm?Edward J. Imwinkelried - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):198-221.
Professionalism in Forensic Bioethics.Bethany J. Spielman - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (3):420-439.
Professionalism in Forensic Bioethics.Bethany J. Speilman - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (3):420-439.
Professionalism in Forensic Bioethics.Bethany J. Speilman - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (3):420-439.

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Citations of this work BETA

Motion(Less) in Limine.Giles Scofield - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):821-833.
Motion(Less) in Limine.Giles Scofield - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):821-833.

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