Embodied cognition and temporally extended agency

Synthese 195 (5):2089-2112 (2018)
Authors
Markus E. Schlosser
University College Dublin
Abstract
According to radical versions of embodied cognition, human cognition and agency should be explained without the ascription of representational mental states. According to a standard reply, accounts of embodied cognition can explain only instances of cognition and agency that are not “representation-hungry”. Two main types of such representation-hungry phenomena have been discussed: cognition about “the absent” and about “the abstract”. Proponents of representationalism have maintained that a satisfactory account of such phenomena requires the ascription of mental representations. Opponents have denied this. I will argue that there is another important representation-hungry phenomenon that has been overlooked in this debate: temporally extended planning agency. In particular, I will argue that it is very difficult to see how planning agency can be explained without the ascription of mental representations, even if we grant, for the sake of argument, that cognition about the absent and abstract can. We will see that this is a serious challenge for the radical as well as the more modest anti-representationalist versions of embodied cognition, and we will see that modest anti-representationalism is an unstable position.
Keywords Mental representation  Embodied cognition  Anti-representationalism  Agency  Philosophy of cognitive science
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1007/s11229-017-1320-4
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Intention and Motor Representation in Purposive Action.Stephen Andrew Butterfill & Corrado Sinigaglia - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (1):119-145.
Minds: Extended or Scaffolded? [REVIEW]Kim Sterelny - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):465-481.

View all 27 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Non-Representationalist Cognitive Science and Realism.Karim Zahidi - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):461-475.
Cognition and Behavior.Ken Aizawa - 2017 - Synthese 194 (11):4269-4288.
How to Be an Anti-Representationalist.Anthony Patrick Chemero - 1999 - Dissertation, Indiana University
Embodied Social Cognition.Shannon Spaulding - 2011 - Philosophical Topics 39 (1):141-162.
Representation-Hunger Reconsidered.Jan Degenaar & Erik Myin - 2014 - Synthese 191 (15):3639-3648.
The Functionalist's Body.Robert D. Rupert - 2014 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 5 (2):258-268.
Intentionality and Embodied Cognition.Mark Rowlands - 2011 - Philosophical Topics 39 (1):81-97.
Is Social Cognition Embodied?Alvin Goldman & Frederique de Vignemont - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):154-159.
Locked-in Syndrome: A Challenge for Embodied Cognitive Science.Miriam Kyselo & Ezequiel Di Paolo - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (3):517-542.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2017-01-10

Total downloads
1,503 ( #761 of 2,293,852 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
321 ( #772 of 2,293,852 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Monthly downloads

My notes

Sign in to use this feature