Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):190-190 (2006)

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Abstract
Different aspects of people's interactions with money are best conceptualized using the drug and tool theories. The key question is when these models of money are most likely to guide behavior. We suggest that the Drug Theory characterizes motivationally active uses of money and that the Tool Theory characterizes behavior in motivationally cool situations. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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DOI 10.1017/s0140525x06389042
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