Authors
Neil Levy
Oxford University
Thomas Douglas
Oxford University
Abstract
This article presents a model for regulating cognitive enhancement devices. Recently, it has become very easy for individuals to purchase devices which directly modulate brain function. For example, transcranial direct current stimulators are increasingly being produced and marketed online as devices for cognitive enhancement. Despite posing risks in a similar way to medical devices, devices that do not make any therapeutic claims do not have to meet anything more than basic product safety standards. We present the case for extending existing medical device legislation to cover CEDs. Medical devices and CEDs operate by the same or similar mechanisms and pose the same or similar risks. This fact coupled with the arbitrariness of the line between treatment and enhancement count in favour of regulating these devices in the same way. In arguing for this regulatory model, the paper highlights potential challenges to its implementation, and suggests solutions.
Keywords cognitive enhancement  human enhancement  regulatory model
Categories (categorize this paper)
Reprint years 2014
DOI 10.1093/jlb/lst003
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 54,385
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

View all 13 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2015-02-28

Total views
39 ( #252,793 of 2,362,031 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #553,136 of 2,362,031 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes