Impersonal Value, Universal Value, and the Scope of Cultural Heritage

Ethics 125 (4):999-1027 (2015)
Abstract
Philosophers have used the terms 'impersonal' and 'personal value' to refer to, among others things, whether something's value is universal or particular to an individual. In this paper, I propose an account of impersonal value that, I argue, better captures the intuitive distinction than potential alternatives, while providing conceptual resources for moving beyond the traditional stark dichotomy. I illustrate the practical importance of my theoretical account with reference to debate over the evaluative scope of cultural heritage.
Keywords Impersonal Value  Universal Value  Cultural Heritage  Value  Valuing  Reasons  Personal Value
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DOI 10.1086/680908
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