Authors
Erich Hatala Matthes
Wellesley College
Abstract
Museums are home to millions of artworks and cultural artifacts, some of which have made their way to these institutions through unjust means. Some argue that these objects should be repatriated (i.e. returned to their country or culture of origin). However, these arguments face a series of philosophical challenges. In particular, repatriation, even if justified, is often portrayed as contrary to the aims and values of museums. However, in this paper, I argue that some of the very considerations museums appeal to in order to oppose repatriation claims can be turned on their heads and marshaled in favor of the practice. In addition to defending against objections to repatriation, this argument yields the surprising conclusion that the redistribution of cultural goods should be much more radical than is typically supposed.
Keywords repatriation  culture  historical injustice  distributive justice  recognition  reparations  museums  universal value
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Reprint years 2017
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/ergo.12405314.0004.032
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References found in this work BETA

The Metaphysics of Social Groups.Katherine Ritchie - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (5):310-321.
Cultural Appropriation Without Cultural Essentialism?Erich Hatala Matthes - 2016 - Social Theory and Practice 42 (2):343-366.
Group Assertion.Jennifer Lackey - 2018 - Erkenntnis 83 (1):21-42.
What's Wrong with Colonialism.Lea Ypi - 2013 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (2):158-191.

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Citations of this work BETA

Cultural Appropriation and Oppression.Erich Matthes - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (4):1003-1013.
Environmental Heritage and the Ruins of the Future.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2019 - In Carolyn Korsmeyer, Jeanette Bicknell & Jennifer Judkins (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Ruins, Monuments, and Memorials. Routledge.

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