Science Communication and Epistemic Injustice


Authors
Valerie Joly Chock
University of North Florida
Jonathan Matheson
University of North Florida
Abstract
Epistemic injustice occurs when someone is wronged in their capacity as a knower.[1] More and more attention is being paid to the epistemic injustices that exist in our scientific practices. In a recent paper, Fabien Medvecky argues that science communication is fundamentally epistemically unjust. In what follows we briefly explain his argument before raising several challenges to it.
Keywords Epistemic Injustice  Science Communication
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References found in this work BETA

Fairness in Knowing: Science Communication and Epistemic Justice.Fabien Medvecky - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (5):1393-1408.
Epistemic Injustice — Power and the Ethics of Knowing.Miranda Flicker - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):117-119.

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