Abstract
The Brambell Report of 1965 recommended that animals should have the freedom to stand up, lie down, turn around, groom themselves and stretch their limbs. The Farm Animal Welfare Council (FAWC) developed these into the Five Freedoms, which are a framework for the analysis of animal welfare. The Five Freedoms are well known in farming, policy making and academic circles. They form the basis of much animal welfare legislation, codes of recommendations and farm animal welfare accreditation schemes, and are the foundation of the Welfare Quality® assessment scheme. The Five Freedoms are also extensively employed for the education of veterinary and animal welfare science students. Hence they have proven to be of great practical utility. In this paper, the Five Freedoms framework is examined in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions for the analysis of animal welfare. Overall, the Five Freedoms are judged to be individually necessary and jointly sufficient as a framework for the analysis of animal welfare. FAWC has recently criticized the Five Freedoms for concentrating on negative aspects of welfare. However, it is shown here how the satisfaction of the Five Freedoms should lead to good welfare, from the animal’s point of view. The Five Freedoms are formulated as ideals of animal welfare. This has significant advantages that have likely contributed to their impact. However, the ideality of the Five Freedoms means that the framework is without power to determine what a satisfactory level of animal welfare is, in an ethical sense
Keywords Animal welfare  Critical analysis  Farm Animal Welfare Council  Five freedoms  Ideality
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DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9434-7
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References found in this work BETA

Beyond 'Compassion and Humanity': Justice for Nonhuman Animals.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2004 - In Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press. pp. 299--320.
Welfare is to Do with What Animals Feel.Ian J. H. Duncan - forthcoming - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.

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Citations of this work BETA

The Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare Are Rights.Clare McCausland - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):649-662.

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