Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):307-327 (2003)

Authors
Jon McGinnis
University of Missouri, St. Louis
Abstract
: The present study considers Ibn Sînâ's (Lat. Avicenna) account of induction (istiqra') and experimentation (tajriba). For Ibn Sînâ induction purportedly provided the absolute, necessary and certain first principles of a science. Ibn Sînâ criticized induction, arguing that it can neither guarantee the necessity nor provide the primitiveness required of first principles. In it place, Ibn Sînâ developed a theory of experimentation, which avoids the pitfalls of induction by not providing absolute, but conditional, necessary and certain first principles. The theory of experimentation that emerges though not modern, does have elements that are similar to a modern conception of scientific method
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DOI 10.1353/hph.2003.0033
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Xi *-on Knowledge of Particulars.Peter Adamson - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (3):273-294.
Induction and Natural Necessity in the Middle Ages.Stathis Psillos - 2015 - Philosophical Inquiry 39 (1):92-134.
Causation in Arabic and Islamic Thought.Kara Richardson - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Experiments: Why and How?Sven Hansson - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (3):613-632.

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