Abstract
Domestic litigation has become a principal strategy for realizing international treaty obligations for the human right to health, providing causes of action for the public’s health and empowering individuals to raise human rights claims for HIV prevention, treatment, and care. In the past 15 years, advocates have laid the groundwork on which a rapidly expanding enforcement paradigm has arisen at the intersection of human rights litigation and HIV/AIDS policy. As this enforcement develops across multiple countries, human rights are translated from principle to practice in the global response to HIV/AIDS, transforming aspirational declarations into justiciable obligations and implementing human rights through national policies and programs.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1111/j.1748-720X.2011.00573.x
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 55,873
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Trade Rules, Intellectual Property, and the Right to Health.Lisa Forman - 2007 - Ethics and International Affairs 21 (3):337-357.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

A Strategy of Clinical Tolerance for the Prevention of Hiv and Aids in China.Yanguang Wang - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (1):48 – 61.
Health Care Workers with Hiv and a Patient's Right to Know.Timothy F. Murphy - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (6):553-569.
The HIV/aIDS Pandemic: A Sign of Instability in a Complex Global System.Solomon R. Benatar - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (2):163 – 177.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2011-02-11

Total views
6 ( #1,062,043 of 2,401,778 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #551,897 of 2,401,778 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes