Doing Away with Juan Crow: Two Standards for Just Immigration Reform


Authors
José Jorge Mendoza
University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Abstract
In 2008 Robert Lovato coined the phrase Juan Crow. Juan Crow is a type of policy or enforcement of immigration laws that discriminate against Latino/as in the United States. This essay looks at the implications this phenomenon has for an ethics of immigration. It argues that Juan Crow, like its predecessor Jim Crow, is not merely a condemnation of federalism, but of any immigration reform that has stricter enforcement as one of its key components. Instead of advocating for increased enforcement, I want to suggest that just immigration reform must adhere to two standards, equality of burdens and universal protections, and that only by doing so can the potential for Juan Crow be adequately avoided.
Keywords Immigration  Juan Crow  Federalism  Latino/as
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The Political Philosophy of Unauthorized Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2011 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 10 (2):2-6.
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