Utilitas 23 (2):161-182 (2011)

Authors
András Miklós
University of Rochester
Abstract
This paper develops an account of how economic and political institutions can limit the applicability of principles of justice even in non-relational cosmopolitan conceptions. It shows that fundamental principles of justice underdetermine fair distributive shares as well as justice -based requirements. It argues that institutions partially constitute the content of justice by determining distributive shares and by resolving indeterminacies about justice -based requirements resulting from strategic interaction and disagreement. In the absence of existing institutions principles of justice might not be applicable for assessing distributions or guiding individual action and institutional design. Hence, accepting a specific cosmopolitan conception of justice is insufficient to settle global distributive questions.
Keywords global justice  cosmopolitanism  political institutions
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1017/s0953820811000045
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 52,919
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Rescuing Justice and Equality.G. A. Cohen (ed.) - 2008 - Harvard University Press.
The Problem of Global Justice.Thomas Nagel - 2005 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (2):113-147.
Two Treatises of Government.John Locke - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.

View all 25 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2012-02-20

Total views
104 ( #89,745 of 2,343,525 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #515,031 of 2,343,525 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes