A theory of representation to complement TEC

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):894-895 (2001)
Abstract
The target article can be strengthened by supplementing it with a better theory of mental representation. Given such a theory, there is reason to suppose that, first, even the most primitive representations are mostly of distal affairs; second, the most primitive representations also turn out to be directed two ways at once, both stating facts and directing action.
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