Economics and Philosophy 37 (3):462-483 (2021)

Authors
Kian Mintz-Woo
University College, Cork
Abstract
Climate ethics has been concerned with polluter pays, beneficiary pays and ability to pay principles, all of which consider climate change as a single negative externality. This paper considers it as a constellation of externalities, positive and negative, with different associated demands of justice. This is important because explicitly considering positive externalities has not to our knowledge been done in the climate ethics literature. Specifically, it is argued that those who enjoy passive gains from climate change owe gains not to the net losers, but to the emitters, just as the emitters owe compensation to the net losers for the negative externality. This is defended by appeal to theoretical virtues and to the social benefits of generating positive externalities, even when those positive externalities are coupled with far greater negative externalities. We call this the Polluter Pays, Then Receives ('PPTR', or 'Peter') Principle. This principle is then applied at two levels in the context of Canada. [Open access]
Keywords climate ethics  applied ethics  climate change  carbon tax  climate policy  polluter pays  beneficiary pays  Canada
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DOI 10.1017/s0266267120000449
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References found in this work BETA

Climate Change and the Duties of the Advantaged.Simon Caney - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):203-228.
Cosmopolitan Justice, Responsibility, and Global Climate Change.Simon Caney - 2005 - Leiden Journal of International Law 18 (4):747-775.

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Citations of this work BETA

Carbon Pricing Ethics.Kian Mintz-Woo - forthcoming - Philosophy Compass:e12803.

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