Competence to know

Philosophical Studies 172 (1):29-56 (2015)
Authors
Lisa Miracchi
University of Pennsylvania
Abstract
I argue against traditional virtue epistemology on which knowledge is a success due to a competence to believe truly, by revealing an in-principle problem with the traditional virtue epistemologist’s explanation of Gettier cases. The argument eliminates one of the last plausible explanation of Gettier cases, and so of knowledge, in terms of non-factive mental states and non-mental conditions. I then I develop and defend a different kind of virtue epistemology, on which knowledge is an exercise of a competence to know. I show how the account, while circular, is not viciously so. It explains both how knowledge is a mental state, as well as the relationship between knowledge and justification, including justified false beliefs and Gettier cases. Moreover, although direct virtue epistemology is compatible with many views on the nature of belief, it can explain how knowledge might be metaphysically more fundamental than belief as well
Keywords Knowledge  Virtue epistemology  Knowledge-first epistemology  Gettier cases  Dispositions  Competence
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DOI 10.1007/s11098-014-0325-9
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References found in this work BETA

Knowledge and its Limits.Timothy Williamson - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
Warrant and Proper Function.Alvin Plantinga - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
Mind and World.John McDowell - 1994 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Knowledge and Practical Interests.Jason Stanley - 2005 - Oxford University Press.

View all 48 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Skill in Epistemology I: Skill and Knowledge.Carlotta Pavese - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (11):642-649.
Knowledge-How, Abilities, and Questions.Joshua Habgood-Coote - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:00-00.
Virtuous Distinctions.Will Fleisher - 2017 - Synthese 194 (8):2973–3003.

View all 14 citations / Add more citations

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