Mind and Language 21 (4):475-483 (2006)

Authors
Christopher Mole
University of British Columbia
Sean Kelly
Harvard University
Abstract
The work of Alan Cowey and Petra Stoerig is often taken to have shown that, following lesions analogous to those that cause blindsight in humans, there is blindsight in monkeys. The present paper reveals a problem in Cowey and Stoerig's case for blindsight in monkeys. The problem is that Cowey and Stoerig's results would only provide good evidence for blindsight if there is no difference between their two experimental paradigms with regard to the sorts of stimuli that are likely to come to consciousness. We show that the paradigms could differ in this respect, given the connections that have been shown to exist between working memory, perceptual load, attention, and consciousness.
Keywords *Brain Lesions  *Experimental Design  *Monkeys  *Visual Perception
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DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0017.2006.00287.x
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References found in this work BETA

Blindsight in Monkeys.Alan Cowey - 1995 - Nature 373:247-9.
A Case Where Access Implies Qualia?Andy Clark - 2000 - Analysis 60 (1):30-37.

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