Moral and nonmoral freedom in Kant

Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (1):129-148 (2007)
Abstract
Many scholars, in view of the close link that he draws between morality and freedom, argue that Kant does not think that there are free choices between nonmoral ends. On this view, Kant only posits a freedom to resist our desires and act morally. We are still responsible for immoral choices because we always have the power to act morally. Henry Allison has opposed this reading by arguing that Kant grounds a notion of nonmoral freedom in the Incorporation Thesis. In this paper, I criticize Allison’s argument and then try to replace it with an alternative that grounds nonmoral freedom in morality
Keywords Analytic Philosophy  Contemporary Philosophy  General Interest
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ISBN(s) 0038-4283
DOI 10.1111/j.2041-6962.2007.tb00046.x
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Kant's Transcendental Idealism.Henry E. Allison - 2004 - Yale University Press.
Self and Nature in Kant's Philosophy.Allen W. Wood (ed.) - 1984 - Cornell University Press.

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