Molyneux's question: vision, touch, and the philosophy of perception

New York: Cambridge University Press (1977)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

If a man born blind were to gain his sight in later life would he be able to identify the objects he saw around him? Would he recognise a cube and a globe on the basis of his earlier tactile experiences alone? This was William Molyneux's famous question to John Locke and it was much discussed by English and French empiricists in the eighteenth century as part of the controversy over innatism and abstract ideas. Dr Morgan examines the whole history of this debate: Locke's own (negative) answer to the question, the contributions of Berkeley, Condillac, Diderot and Voltaire and the factual accounts of early cataract operations and modern laboratory studies. He shows how this debate is involved in the development and eventual separation of philosophy and experimental psychology after the eighteenth century and considers why the original question is effectively still unanswered. This is one problem-area with its intricate cluster of connected conceptual and technical difficulties which suggests the need for some reunion or at least collaboration between the two subjects.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 91,219

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Thomas Reid on Molyneux's question.Robert Hopkins - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):340-364.
Molyneux’s Question.Robert Hopkins - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):441-464.
Touch and situatedness.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2008 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (3):299 – 322.
The perception of shape.David H. Sanford - 1983 - In Carl Ginet & Sydney Shoemaker (eds.), Knowledge And Mind: Phil Essays. Oxford University Press.
Molyneux's question: Vision, touch, and the philosophy of perception. [REVIEW]Sara Shute - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):255-257.

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
69 (#228,339)

6 months
11 (#196,102)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references