Abstract
There are two facets to the central dogma proposed by Francis Crick in 1957. One concerns the relation between the sequence of nucleotides and the sequence of amino acids, the second is devoted to the relation between the sequence of amino acids and the native three-dimensional structure of proteins. 'Folding is simply a function of the order of the amino acids,' i.e. no information is required for the proper folding of a protein other than the information contained in its sequence. This protein side of the central dogma was elaborated in a scientific context in which the characteristics and functions of proteins, and the mechanisms of protein folding, were seen very differently. This context, which made the folding problem a simple one, supported the bold proposition of Francis Crick. The protein side of the central dogma was not challenged by the discovery of prions if one adopts the definition of information given by Francis Crick. It might have been challenged by the discovery that regulatory enzymes exist in different conformations, and the evidence for the existence of chaperones assisting protein folding. But it was not, and folding remains what it was for Francis Crick, 'simply a function of the order of amino acids'. But the meaning of 'function' has dramatically changed. It is no longer the result of simple physicochemical laws, but that of a long evolutionary process which has optimized protein folding. Molecular mechanistic explanations have to be allied with evolutionary explanations, in a way characteristic of present biology
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 54,466
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Crick's Notion of Genetic Information and the ‘Central Dogma’ of Molecular Biology.Predrag Sustar - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (1):13-24.
Crick's Notion of Genetic Information and the 'Central Dogma' of Molecular Biology.Predrag Šustar - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (1):13-24.
The Prion Challenge to the `Central Dogma' of Molecular Biology, 1965-1991 - Part I: Prelude to Prions.E. M. - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (1):1-19.
Proteins, the Chaperone Function and Heredity.Valeria Mosini - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (1):53-74.
The Central Dogma as a Thesis of Causal Specificity.Marcel Weber - 2006 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (4):595-610.
A Hypothesis of the Code of Nerve Impulses.Pavel E. Moroz - 1980 - Acta Biotheoretica 29 (2):101-109.
Molecular Epigenesis: Distributed Specificity as a Break in the Central Dogma.Karola Stotz - 2006 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (4):533 - 548.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2013-09-29

Total views
11 ( #780,962 of 2,374,862 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #559,821 of 2,374,862 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes