What makes biological organisation teleological?

Synthese 194 (4):1089-1114 (2017)

Abstract

This paper argues that biological organisation can be legitimately conceived of as an intrinsically teleological causal regime. The core of the argument consists in establishing a connection between organisation and teleology through the concept of self-determination: biological organisation determines itself in the sense that the effects of its activity contribute to determine its own conditions of existence. We suggest that not any kind of circular regime realises self-determination, which should be specifically understood as self-constraint: in biological systems, in particular, self-constraint takes the form of closure, i.e. a network of mutually dependent constitutive constraints. We then explore the occurrence of intrinsic teleology in the biological domain and beyond. On the one hand, the organisational account might possibly concede that supra-organismal biological systems could realise closure, and hence be teleological. On the other hand, the realisation of closure beyond the biological realm appears to be highly unlikely. In turn, the occurrence of simpler forms of self-determination remains a controversial issue, in particular with respect to the case of self-organising dissipative systems.

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Author Profiles

Leonardo Bich
University of the Basque Country
Matteo Mossio
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

References found in this work

On the Origin of Species.Charles Darwin - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
Critique of Pure Reason.I. Kant - 1787/1998 - Philosophy 59 (230):555-557.
Critique of Judgment.Immanuel Kant - 1790 - Barnes & Noble.
Functions.Larry Wright - 1973 - Philosophical Review 82 (2):139-168.

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