Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy

Cambridge University Press (2011)

Abstract

Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy in the Poetics.

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Citations of this work

“Aesthetic Ideas”: Mystery and Meaning in the Early Work of Barrie Kosky.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2021 - In James Phillips & John Severn (eds.), Barrie Kosky’s Transnational Theatres. New York, NY, USA: Springer. pp. 59-80.
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(Mis)Counting Catastrophe in Aeschylus’ Persae.Ben Radcliffe - 2022 - Classical Antiquity 41 (1):91-128.
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