Oxford University Press (2010)

Authors
Abstract
We all seem to think that we do the acts we do because we consciously choose to do them. This commonsense view is thrown into dispute by Benjamin Libet's eyebrow-raising experiments, which seem to suggest that conscious will occurs not before but after the start of brain activity that produces physical action.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
Reprint years 2011
Buy this book Find it on Amazon.com
ISBN(s) 9780195381641   0195381645
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 64,046
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
Chapters BETA

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Beyond Empiricism: Realizing the Ethical Mission of Management.Julian Friedland - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (3):329-356.

View all 7 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Does the Brain Lead the Mind?Storrs Mccall - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (2):262-265.
On the Alleged Illusion of Conscious Will.Marc van Duijn & Sacha Bem - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (6):699-714.
The Neural Time Factor in Conscious and Unconscious Events.Benjamin W. Libet - 1993 - In G. R. Bock & James L. Marsh (eds.), Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 174). pp. 174--123.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2012-03-07

Total views
2 ( #1,415,798 of 2,454,450 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #449,269 of 2,454,450 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes