Agriculture and Human Values 35 (2):319-329 (2018)

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Mark Christopher Navin
Oakland University
Abstract
This paper builds on previous research about the potential downsides of food sovereignty activism in relatively wealthy societies by developing a three-part taxonomy of harms that may arise in such contexts. These are direct opposition, false equivalence, and diluted goals and methods. While this paper provides reasons to resist complacency about wealthy-world food sovereignty, we are optimistic about the potential for food sovereignty in wealthy societies, and we conclude by describing how wealthy-world food sovereignty can be a location of either transnational solidarity or nonharmful forms of cooptation.
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DOI 10.1007/s10460-017-9823-7
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