Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):271-289 (2013)

Authors
Peter van Elswyk
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Jake Nebel
University of Southern California
Ben Holguín
New York University
1 more
Abstract
This paper is about teaching philosophy to high school students through Lincoln-Douglas (LD) debate. LD, also known as “values debate,” includes topics from ethics and political philosophy. Thousands of high school students across the U.S. debate these topics in class, after school, and at weekend tournaments. We argue that LD is a particularly effective tool for teaching philosophy, but also that LD today falls short of its potential. We argue that the problems with LD are not inevitable, and we offer strategic recommendations for improving LD as a tool for teaching philosophy. Ultimately, our aim is to create a dialogue between LD and academic philosophy, with the hope that such dialogue will improve LD’s capacity to teach students how to do philosophy
Keywords teaching philosophy  pedagogy
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ISBN(s) 0145-5788
DOI 10.5840/teachphil201336334
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References found in this work BETA

Law's Empire.R. DWORKIN - 1986 - Harvard University Press.
Famine, Affluence, and Morality.Peter Singer - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):229-243.
The Limits of Morality.Shelly Kagan - 1989 - Oxford University Press.

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