A Sensible Confucian Perspective on Abortion

Authors
Amy Olberding
University of Oklahoma
Abstract
Confucian resources for moral discourse and public policy concerning abortion have potential to broaden the prevailing forms of debate in Western societies. However, what form a Confucian contribution might take is itself debatable. This essay provides a critique of Philip J. Ivanhoe’s recent proposal for a Confucian account of abortion. I contend that Ivanhoe’s approach is neither particularly Confucian, nor viable as effective and humane public policy. Affirmatively, I argue that a Confucian approach to abortion will assiduously root moral consideration and public policy in evidence-based strategies that recognize the complexity of the phenomena of unplanned pregnancy and abortion. What most distinguishes a Confucian approach, I argue, is a refusal to treat abortion as a moral dilemma that stands free of the myriad social conditions and societal inequities in which empirical evidence shows it situates.
Keywords Abortion  Confucianism  Public policy  Family planning  Family
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DOI 10.1007/s11712-015-9433-2
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References found in this work BETA

A Confucian Perspective on Abortion.Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):37-51.
Sexual Assault and the Problem of Consent.Patricia Kazan - 1998 - In Stanley French, Wanda Teays & Laura Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press. pp. 27--42.
Confucian Ethics, Public Policy, and the Nurse-Family Partnership.Erin M. Cline - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (3):337-356.

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Citations of this work BETA

Birth with Dignity From the Confucian Perspective.Jianhui Li & Yaming Li - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (5):375-388.
Confucianism, Human Dignity, and Reverence for Life.Erin M. Cline - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):607-617.

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