The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology

Oxford University Press (1997)

Abstract

Most philosophers writing about personal identity in recent years claim that what it takes for us to persist through time is a matter of psychology. In this groundbreaking new book, Eric Olson argues that such approaches face daunting problems, and he defends in their place a radically non-psychological account of personal identity. He defines human beings as biological organisms, and claims that no psychological relation is either sufficient or necessary for an organism to persist. Olson rejects several famous thought-experiments dealing with personal identity. He argues, instead, that one could survive the destruction of all of one's psychological contents and capabilities as long as the human organism remains alive--as long as its vital functions, such as breathing, circulation, and metabolism, continue

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Eric T. Olson
University of Sheffield

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Citations of this work

Generic Animalism.Andrew M. Bailey & Peter van Elswyk - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy 118 (8):405-429.
Were You a Part of Your Mother?Elselijn Kingma - 2019 - Mind 128 (511):609-646.
We Are Not Human Beings.Derek Parfit - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (1):5-28.
Animalism.Andrew M. Bailey - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):867-883.
Varieties of the Extended Self.Richard Heersmink - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 85:103001.

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