Methodology of the Sciences

In Michael N. Forster & Kristin Gjesdal (eds.), Oxford Handbook of German Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 594-606 (2015)
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Abstract

In the growing Prussian university system of the early nineteenth century, "Wissenschaft" (science) was seen as an endeavor common to university faculties, characterized by a rigorous methodology. On this view, history and jurisprudence are sciences, as much as is physics. Nineteenth century trends challenged this view: the increasing influence of materialist and positivist philosophies, profound changes in the relationships between university faculties, and the defense of Kant's classification of the sciences by neo-Kantians. Wilhelm Dilthey's defense of the independence of the methodology of the human sciences (Geisteswissenschaften) from those of the natural sciences (Naturwissenschaften) is as much a return to the ideal of Wissenschaft as a cooperative endeavor as it is a defense of the autonomy of interpretive or hermeneutic methods. The debate between Dilthey and the neo-Kantian Wilhelm Windelband at the close of the century illuminates the development of this dialogue over the nineteenth century.

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Lydia Patton
Virginia Tech

Citations of this work

Goltz against cerebral localization: Methodology and experimental practices.J. P. Gamboa - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 84:101304.
Dilthey on the unity of science.Nabeel Hamid - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (4):635-656.
Wilhelm Windelband.Katherina Kinzel - 2019 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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