Circe de Clásicos y Modernos 22 (1):63-78 (2018)

Abstract
En el presente artículo analizaré el proceso de feminización sufrido por el protagonista de Orestes como parte del avance de la locura. Por un lado, se adjudica el origen de la enfermedad a unos monstruos femeninos, las Erinias, que además constituyen el objeto de la alucinación; por otro lado, para referirse a la conducta del hijo de Agamenón se registra lenguaje propio de la bacanal, ritual conducido principalmente por mujeres en Grecia. Desde mi punto de vista, la feminización de Orestes alcanza la asimilación con las diosas y las seguidoras de Dioniso, en tanto el personaje actúa como ellas y busca la venganza y el castigo. In this article, I will analyze the feminization process suffered by Orestes’ main character as part of the progress of his madness. On the one hand, the origin of the disease is attributed to feminine monsters, the Erinyes, which are also the hallucination object. On the other hand, it is used when referring to Orestes’ behavior the language of the Bacchanal, a ritual performed mainly by women in Greece. From my point of view, the feminization achieves the assimilation with the Erinyes and the followers of Dionysus, thus the main character acts like them and seeks revenge and punishment.
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DOI 10.19137/circe-2018-220104
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