Privacy at work – ethical criteria

Journal of Business Ethics 42 (1):59 - 70 (2003)

Authors
Sven Ove Hansson
Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm
Abstract
New technologies and practices, such as drug testing, genetic testing, and electronic surveillance infringe upon the privacy of workers on workplaces. We argue that employees have a prima facie right to privacy, but this right can be overridden by competing moral principles that follow, explicitly or implicitly, from the contract of employment. We propose a set of criteria for when intrusions into an employee''s privacy are justified. Three types of justification are specified, namely those that refer to the employer''s interests, to the interests of the employee her- or himself, and to the interests of third parties such as customers and fellow workers. For each of these three types, sub-criteria are proposed that can be used to determine whether a particular infringement into an employee''s privacy is morally justified or not.
Keywords contract of employment  drug testing  ethical criteria  ethics  genetic testing  privacy  surveillance  work
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Reprint years 2004
DOI 10.1023/A:1021600419449
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Codes of Ethics in the Light of Fairness and Harm.Dan Munter - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (2):174-188.

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