Naming the Multiple: Poststructuralism and Education

Bergin & Garvey (1998)
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Abstract

Poststructuralism--as a name for a mode of thinking, a style of philosophizing, a kind of writing--has exercised a profound influence upon contemporary Western thought and the institution of the university. As a French and predominantly Parisian affair, poststructuralism is inseparable from the intellectual milieu of postwar France, a world dominated by Alexandre Kojève's and Jean Hyppolite's interpretations of Hegel, Jacques Lacan's reading of Freud, Gaston Bachelard's epistemology, George Canguilhem's studies of science, and Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialism. It is also inseparable from the structuralist tradition of linguistics based upon the work of Ferdinand de Saussure and Roman Jacobson, and the structuralist interpretations of Claude Lévi-Strauss, Roland Barthes, Louis Althusser, and the early Michel Foucault. Poststructuralism, considered in terms of contemporary cultural history, can be understood as belonging to the broad movement of European formalism, with explicit historical links to both Formalist and Futurist linguistics and poetics, and with aspects of the European avant-garde, especially André Breton's surrealism. Each essay in this unique collection by and for educators is devoted to the work and educational significance of one of ten major poststructuralist philosophers.

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Citations of this work

Nietzsche, Poststructuralism and Education: After the Subject?Michael Peters - 1997 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (1):1-19.
Hannah Arendt & Jean Baudrillard: Pedagogy in the Consumer Society. [REVIEW]Trevor Norris - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (6):457-477.
Becoming‐Language/Becoming‐Other: Whence Ethics?Semetsky Inna - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (3):313-325.

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