Rousseau and the paradoxes of property

European Journal of Political Theory 12 (4):409-424 (2013)
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Abstract

Rousseau’s life and his work are notoriously paradoxical. This certainly applies to his work on property which includes one of the most powerful of all denunciations of private property (the Second Discourse) and an affirmation of private property as ‘the most sacred of all citizens’ rights, and in some respects more important than freedom itself’ (in the essay on political economy in the Encyclopedie). In this paper, I explore the reasons for this seeming paradox, focusing upon Rousseau’s twin concerns with inequality (rather than equality) and sincerity. In the end, Rousseau’s treatment is not entirely consistent, but it does make sense

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Citations of this work

Republican Environmental Rights.Ashley Dodsworth - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (5):710-724.
Republican Environmental Rights.Ashley Dodsworth - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (5):710-724.

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