Why is an Egg Donor a Genetic Parent, but not a Mitochondrial Donor?


Authors
Monika Piotrowska
State University of New York, Albany
Abstract
What’s the basis for considering an egg donor a genetic parent but not a mitochondrial donor? I will argue that a closer look at the biological facts will not give us an answer to this question because the process by which one becomes a genetic parent, i.e., the process of reproduction, is not a concept that can be settled by looking. It is, rather, a concept in need of philosophical attention. The details of my argument will rest on recent developments in biological technology, but the persuasiveness of my argument will turn on the history of another biological concept, death. Given some important similarities between the two concepts, the way in which ‘death’ evolved in the recent past can provide guidance on how we should think about ‘reproduction.’
Keywords Death  Reproduction  Mitochondrial DNA  Parenthood
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DOI 10.1017/s0963180119000410
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References found in this work BETA

"Are You My Mommy?" On the Genetic Basis of Parenthood.Avery Kolers & Tim Bayne - 2001 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):273–285.
Killing Embryos for Stem Cell Research.Jeff Mcmahan - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):170–189.

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