Methodological Naturalism

Origins and Design 18 (1):18-27 (1997)

Authors
Alvin Plantinga
University of Notre Dame
Abstract
The philosophical doctrine of methodological naturalism holds that, for any study of the world to qualify as "scientific," it cannot refer to God's creative activity (or any sort of divine activity). The methods of science, it is claimed, "give us no purchase" on theological propositions--even if the latter are true--and theology therefore cannot influence scientific explanation or theory justification. Thus, science is said to be religiously neutral, if only because science and religion are, by their very natures, epistemically distinct. However, the actual practice and content of science challenge this claim. In many areas, science is anything but religiously neutral; moreover, the standard arguments for methodological naturalism suffer from various grave shortcomings. [This is the first part of a two-part article.].
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Creationism and Intelligent Design.Robert T. Pennock - 2003 - Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics 4:143-163.

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