History of European Ideas 37 (1):1-6 (2011)

Authors
Jeffrey Pocock
University of London
Abstract
This article seeks to combine two lines of thought that have been little studied: a model history of early modern historiography, and a theory of the impact of historiography on a political society. Under the former heading, it traces the growth of a narrative of European history as a series of sequels to the Roman empire, and a history of historiography as passing from classical narrative to antiquarian study and Enlightened philosophy. Under the latter, it considers the effect on political life of being narrated in a plurality of contexts, and asks whether a modern society can survive if deprived of the capacity for debating its history
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1016/j.histeuroideas.2010.09.002
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 58,242
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Telling Contested Stories: J. G. A. Pocock and Paul Ricoeur.Kenneth Sheppard - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (6):879-898.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2013-11-02

Total views
54 ( #187,022 of 2,419,525 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
2 ( #350,791 of 2,419,525 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes