Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):298-299 (2003)

Authors
Guy Politzer
Institut Jean Nicod
Abstract
It is argued that, in the traditional subject-predicate sentence, two interpretations of the subject term coexist, one intensional and the other extensional, which explains the superficial difference between the traditional S-P relation and the predication of predicate logic. Data from psychological studies of syllogistic reasoning support the view that the contrast between predicate and argument is carried over to the traditional S-P sentence.
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DOI 10.1017/S0140525X03390077
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