Consequentializing

Philosophy Compass 4 (2):329-347 (2009)
Abstract
A growing trend of thought has it that any plausible nonconsequentialist theory can be consequentialized, which is to say that it can be given a consequentialist representation. In this essay, I explore both whether this claim is true and what its implications are. I also explain the procedure for consequentializing a nonconsequentialist theory and give an account of the motivation for doing so.
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DOI 10.1111/j.1747-9991.2009.00198.x
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References found in this work BETA
What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 1998 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
A Theory of Justice.John Rawls - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Philosophy and Rhetoric. Oxford University Press. pp. 133-135.

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Citations of this work BETA
Save (Some of) the Children.Travis Timmerman - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (2):465-472.
Cluelessness.Hilary Greaves - 2016 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 116 (3):311-339.
Non-Compliance Shouldn't Be Better.Andrew T. Forcehimes & Luke Semrau - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.

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