Science, Religious Language, and Analogy

Faith and Philosophy 13 (1):113-120 (1996)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Ian Barbour sees four ways to relate science and religion: (1) conflict, (2) disjunction or independence, (3) dialogue, and (4) synthesis or integration. David Burrell posits three ways to construe religious language, as (a) univocal, (b) equivocal, or (c) analogous. The paper contends that Barbour’s (1) and (4) presuppose Burrell’s (a), Barbour's (2) presupposes Burrell’s (b), and Barbour’s (3) presupposes Burrell’s (c), and it explores some of the implications for each alternative.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 93,296

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Beyond Barbour: New Ways of Teaching the Relationship Between Science and Religion.Bethany N. Sollereder - 2019 - In Berry Billingsley, Keith Chappell & Michael J. Reiss (eds.), Science and Religion in Education. Springer Verlag. pp. 15-18.
Language and metalanguage in Aquinas.David Kolb - 1981 - Journal of Religion:428 – 432.
Turning Barbour’s Model Inside Out: On Using Popular Culture to Teach About Science and Religion.Tuomas W. Manninen - 2019 - In Berry Billingsley, Keith Chappell & Michael J. Reiss (eds.), Science and Religion in Education. Springer Verlag. pp. 19-32.

Analytics

Added to PP
2011-01-09

Downloads
3 (#1,729,579)

6 months
131 (#32,434)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

References found in this work

Analogy and Philosophical Language.David Burrell - 1975 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 8 (4):265-267.
Analogy and philosophical language.David B. Burrell - 1973 - New Haven,: Yale University Press.
The God of Faith and Reason.Robert Sokolowski - 1984 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (1):105-105.

View all 7 references / Add more references