Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):237-237 (2006)

Authors
Nancy Potter
University of Louisville
Abstract
Fostering shame in societies may not curb violence, because shame is alienating. The person experiencing shame may not care enough about others to curb violent instincts. Furthermore, men may be less shame-prone than are women. Finally, if shame is too prevalent in a society, perpetrators may be reluctant to talk about their actions and motives, if indeed they know their own motives. We may be unable accurately to discover how perpetrators think about their own violence.
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DOI 10.1017/s0140525x06369051
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