In Proceedings from the Second International interdisciplinary conference „BIOETHICS – THE SIGN OF A NEW ERA”. Skopje, North Macedonia: pp. 53-65 (2019)

Authors
Evangelos D. Protopapadakis
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Abstract
In this short paper I will discuss the ambiguous and, even, controversial term ‘right to die’ in the context of the euthanasia debate and, in particular, in the case of passive euthanasia. First I will present the major objections towards the moral legitimacy of a right to die, most of which I also endorse myself; then I will investigate whether the right to die could acquire adequate moral justification in the case of passive euthanasia. In the light of the Kantian tradition I will argue that since rights are understood as based upon duties, the right to die should also presuppose a corresponding duty, which to me could be either an imperfect, solidarity-related duty, or an autonomy-related one, at least as far as the unwanted prolongation of life is concerned. I will conclude with the view that the right to die could actually be considered a legitimate one in the case of passive euthanasia, when the application of life-supporting techniques is against the wishes and the best interests of the patient.
Keywords right to die  euthanasia  passive euthanasia  positive and negative rights  perfect duties  imperfect duties  Kantian ethics
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Other versions
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Why Letting Die Instead of Killing?Evangelos Protopapadakis - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 3:85-90.
Passive Euthanasia.E. Garrard - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):65-68.
Ethics and Legality of Euthanasia in Indian Context.V. Prabhu & Tanuja Kalita - 2013 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 23 (2):46-49.
Passive Euthanasia. E. Garrard & S. Wilkinson - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):64-68.
Kantian Ethics and Global Justice.Kok-Chor Tan - 1997 - Social Theory and Practice 23 (1):53-73.
What Passive Euthanasia Is.Iain Brassington - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-13.
Euthanasia is Never “Passive”.Lars Johan Materstvedt - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 20:15-21.
Health Versus Harm: Euthanasia and Physicians' Duties.J. L. A. Garcia - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (1):7 – 24.
Buddhist Approach to Euthanasia.Pramod Kumar - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 20:9-13.
Euthanasia and Physicians' Moral Duties.Gary Seay - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (5):517 – 533.
Passive and Active Euthanasia: What is the Difference? [REVIEW]Bernward Gesang - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):175-180.
Japanese Attitudes Toward Euthanasia In Hypothetical Clinical Situations.Noritoshi Tanida - 1998 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 8 (5):138-141.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2020-09-13

Total views
25 ( #399,588 of 2,349,498 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
25 ( #28,151 of 2,349,498 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes