Authors
Carlo Proietti
University of Amsterdam
Abstract
Group polarization occurs when an initial attitude or belief of individuals becomes more radical after group discussion. Polarization often leads subgroups towards opposite directions. Since the 1960s this effect has been observed and repeatedly confirmed in lab experiments by social psychologists. Persuasive Arguments Theory emerged as the most convincing explanation for this phenomenon. This paper is a first attempt to frame the PAT explanation more formally by means of Bipolar Argumentation Frameworks. In particular, I show that polarization may emerge in a BAF by simple and rational belief updates by participants.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories No categories specified
(categorize this paper)
DOI 10.3233/978-1-61499-686-6-41
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 54,608
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

The Dynamics of Group Polarization.Carlo Proietti - 2017 - In Alexandru Baltag, Jeremy Seligman & Tomoyuki Yamada (eds.), Logic, Rationality, and Interaction. LORI 2017. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 10455. Springer. pp. 195-208.
Persistent Disagreement and Polarization in a Bayesian Setting.Michael Nielsen & Rush T. Stewart - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axy056.
Abduction in Argumentation Frameworks.Chiaki Sakama - 2018 - Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 28 (2-3):218-239.
Why Did John Herschel Fail to Understand Polarization? The Differences Between Object and Event Concepts.Xiang Chen - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (3):491-513.
Scientific Polarization.Cailin O’Connor & James Owen Weatherall - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 8 (3):855-875.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2020-01-13

Total views
3 ( #1,268,894 of 2,385,852 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #556,216 of 2,385,852 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes