Religious Studies 36 (3):277-291 (2000)

Authors
Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad
Lancaster University
Abstract
For Yogacara-Madhyamaka, enlightenment is free of the mistaken conceptual construction of subject and objects of desire. The Buddha's awakening was a state purified of concepts, without desire and suffering. But, subsequently, he compassionately taught of awakening, and teaching is conceptual. Can enlightenment be both cognitively pure and concept-utilizing? To secure cognitive purity while teaching, the philosophers argue that the enlightened person is cleansed of desire for subject and objects, rather than strictly free of concepts of subject and objects. To secure teaching after the attainment of pure cognition, they allow conceptuality, so long as it is free of desire.
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DOI 10.1017/s0034412500005266
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