Women and special vulnerability: Commentary "On the principle of respect for human vulnerability and personal integrity," UNESCO, International Bioethics Committee report


Authors
Mary C. Rawlinson
State University of New York, Stony Brook
Abstract
In the past decade UNESCO has pursued a leadership role in the articulation of general principles for bioethics, as well as an extensive campaign to promulgate these principles globally.1 Since UNESCO's General Conference adopted the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights in 2005, UNESCO's Bioethics Section has worked with member states to develop a "bioethics infrastructure." UNESCO also provides an "Ethics Teacher Training Course" to member states and disseminates a "core curriculum," primarily targeting medical students. The core curriculum orients itself by the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights and aims to articulate a set of "bioethical principles" that provide a "common global .
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DOI 10.2979/intjfemappbio.5.2.174
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