Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1205-1210 (1998)

Abstract
When a person engages in a "game," that person may reason and behave in a manner that is inconsistent with non-game-situation moral reasoning. In this study we measured moral reasoning with the Defining Issues Test (DIT). We then engaged the students in a competitive game and collected accounts of their "reasoning" by having them explain their decisions with a forced choice inventory. The results indicate that there were significant inconsistencies in moral reasoning between non-game and game situations. The implications of this for business ethics are discussed.
Keywords Philosophy   Ethics   Business Education   Economic Growth   Management
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DOI 10.1023/A:1005832115497
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