Abstract
Accounts of video game play developed from an ethnomethodological and conversation analytic perspective remain relatively scarce. This study collects together an emerging, if scattered, body of research which focuses on the material, practical “work” of video game players. The study offers an example-driven explication of an EMCA perspective on video game play phenomena. The materials are arranged as a “tactical zoom.” We start very much “outside” the game, beginning with a wide view of how massive-multiplayer online games are played within dedicated gaming spaces; here, we find multiple players, machines, and many different sorts of activities going on. Still remaining somewhat distanced from the play of the game itself, we then take a closer look at the players themselves by examining a notionally simpler setting involving pairs taking part in a football game at a games console. As we draw closer to the technical details of play, we narrow our focus further still to examine a player and spectator situated “at the screen” but jointly analyzing play as the player competes in an online first-person shooter. Finally, we go “inside” the game entirely and look at the conduct of avatars on-screen via screen recordings of a massively multiplayer online game. Having worked through specific examples, we provide an elaboration of a selection of core topics of ethnomethodology and conversation analysis that is used to situate some of the unstated orientations in the presentation of data fragments. In this way, recurrent issues raised in the fragments are shown as coherent, interconnected phenomena. In closing, we suggest caution regarding the way game play phenomena have been analyzed in this study, while remarking on challenges present for the development of further EMCA-oriented research on video game play.
Keywords Conversation analysis  Video games  Ethnomethodology
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1111/tops.12234
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 69,979
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Doing Gender.Don H. Zimmerman & Candace West - 1987 - Gender and Society 1 (2):125-151.
The Intelligent Use of Space.David Kirsh - 1995 - Artificial Intelligence 73 (1--2):31-68.

View all 14 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

The Qualitative Face of Big Data.Alexander Nicolai Wendt - forthcoming - Journal of Dynamic Decision Making:3-1.

View all 6 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Video Games and the Philosophy of Art.Aaron Smuts - 2005 - American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter.
The Incorrigible Social Meaning of Video Game Imagery.Stephanie Patridge - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (4):303-312.
Locating the Wrongness in Ultra-Violent Video Games.David I. Waddington - 2007 - Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):121-128.
Defending the Morality of Violent Video Games.Marcus Schulzke - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):127-138.
Musical Ecologies in Video Games.Michiel Kamp - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):235-249.
Detecting Health Problems Related to Addiction of Video Game Playing Using an Expert System.Samy S. Abu Naser & Mohran H. Al-Bayed - 2016 - World Wide Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development 2 (9):7-12.
Video Games as Self‐Involving Interactive Fictions.Jon Robson & Aaron Meskin - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):165-177.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2016-11-30

Total views
18 ( #607,873 of 2,505,136 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #416,587 of 2,505,136 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes